Pendants Created from Paper aka Papier Mache Clay (PMC) – Best out of Waste

by Matsa Zilih.
(Serbia/Czechia)

Pendants Created from Paper aka Papier Mache Clay (PMC) - Best out of Waste, by Matsa Zilih  - featured on Jewelry Making Journal

pendant with texture

Being around for quite a while, today’s fan badge surprise on FB group nudged me to finish this article I started months ago.

Hi Rena and everyone,

My passion is upcycling so most of the items (jewelry, home décor ) I create are made from recycled paper – paper mache and found objects. And yes, you may call me junk artist 😊.

I use all sorts of waste-paper to firstly make clay from papier mache and then I create pendants from it.  As the base material to make PMC for the pendants featured on the photos, I used printed paper – old copies of documents that over time cluttered my drawers.

Then, I form them in different shapes and sizes – either by hands or using tools (for example: a glass with thin walls or cookie-cutters) so they look like big flat pebbles, but unlike pebbles, being made from paper, they are light-weight and don’t feel as a burden on your neck.

After the clay is dry, I prime the pendants with white acrylic paint and the next step is painting with a colour of my liking.

And then, for decoration, I use various techniques like:

* decoupage with pieces of a napkin: Image 1

Pendants Created from Paper aka Papier Mache Clay (PMC) - Best out of Waste, by Matsa Zilih  - featured on Jewelry Making Journal

decoupaged pendant

* texture: Image 2

Pendants Created from Paper aka Papier Mache Clay (PMC) - Best out of Waste, by Matsa Zilih  - featured on Jewelry Making Journal

pendant with texture

* free hand drawing: Image 3

Pendants Created from Paper aka Papier Mache Clay (PMC) - Best out of Waste, by Matsa Zilih  - featured on Jewelry Making Journal

pendant with hand drawing

* acrylic pour (which has become very popular in the last couple of years):  Image 4

Pendants Created from Paper aka Papier Mache Clay (PMC) - Best out of Waste, by Matsa Zilih  - featured on Jewelry Making Journal

heart pendants painted with fluid acrylic paints

In the end I protect the pendants with several coats of a strong sealer and add a cord with beads that slide so the necklace length gets adjustable: from ~40 up to ~60/70/80.
Thank you

Matsa Zilih
Unique Art Gifts by 3xRe

FREE - Get 7 Super Jewelry Making Hacks

Get Rena's 7 Super Jewelry Making Hacks, plus the Jewelry Making Journal Newsletter - all for FREE.

We Respect Your Email Privacy

  • Rena Klingenberg says:

    Matsa, this is a wonderful way to recycle paper. I like that these pieces are light-weight and that you have so many different ways to finish each pendant. Thank you for sharing this fascinating technique!

  • Ragan says:

    I was just looking yesterday at some lovely papier mache ornaments I have from India and wondering if something similar could be done with jewelry and then today I saw this post. I think that means I should give it a try. Hopefully I am better at it now then when I was a kid! But it is not too expensive to find out, I have all sorts of paper, sealants, acrylic paints, etc. already.

  • Matsa says:

    Thank you Rena for your kind words. The possibilities of making things with papier mache and its clay are endless and something that I forgot to say – this clay has many properties of the ceramic one but it’s inexpensive, and above all unbreakable. Pendants won’t break when fall, tested it many times 🙂

  • Haha, Matsa – thinking of your “testing” if the pendants break when they fall. 🙂

  • Marnie says:

    Matsa, I really love the pendant with the up-cycled napkin, it’s so feminine. Just a friendly heads up, PMC (precious metal clay) is a registered, trademarked name with the Mitsubishi company.

  • Matsa says:

    Oh, thank you Marnie.
    Had no idea about trademark, i ‘adopted’ the term as an abbreviation from people from whom I learnt the technique (on YT), for practical reasons only. Thanks for warning 🙂

  • Carol Burton says:

    Love your pendants! I’m looking for a project to do with my church group. This project looks like fun and less cost. I suppose you have a special way of doing this technique. It would take me some time to learn. Keep up the wonderful work!

  • Matsa says:

    Thank you, Carol, for the compliments.
    It is fun and easy, and the cost is negligible. If you wish you may contact me for my recipe. I’m not sure if I can share it here.

  • >