Wrap Choker Necklace (Tutorial)

by Rena Klingenberg.

Wrap Choker Necklace

The leather wrap choker necklace that was popular in the 1970’s has made a strong comeback.

(I have also seen this renewed style being called a “bolo necklace”.)

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

This necklace style is basically a long cord that wraps around the throat, with long or short ends that usually have some sort of decoration on them.

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Of course there are all kinds of ways to springboard off the original leather or suede cord design to create interesting variations!

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

And that’s what we’re going to explore here today.

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Let’s see how you might create a wrap choker necklace using components you already have in your stash.

IMPORTANT: Because this necklace style wraps around the throat, it is NOT appropriate for people under the age of 18.

Supplies:

  • Cord or smooth chain, measuring anywhere from 18″ (45.7cm) to 60″ (152.4cm) long.
    In the examples below, I’ve used:

    • 18″ (45.7cm) vintage twist chain.
    • 36″ (91.4cm) multi-colored art fiber yarn strand.
    • 38″ (96.5cm) robin-egg blue satin cord.
    • 60″ (152.4cm) natural leather cord in 2mm size.
  • Things to dangle from the cord / chain ends.
    In my examples here, I used:

  • Other things you might also consider using for your cord ends are feathers, mismatched (asymmetrical) pendants, or wire-wrapped briolettes (see my Briolette Wire-Wrapping Techniques Tutorial).
  • For some of the dangles, you may need jump rings.
    If you’re new to using jump rings, see my quick tip, How to Open and Close a Jump Ring.
  • Flat nose pliers and chain nose pliers if you use jump rings.
  • Scissors to cut your cord.

How to Make a
Wrap Choker Necklace:

Below I’ll show you how I created each of these four different versions.

These materials are just examples – be sure to tap into your own stash to see what you’ve got in there for making your own necklaces!

Wrap Choker Necklace #1:
Satin Cord and Tassels

The smoothness of satin cord makes this a comfortable, lightweight necklace.

You can have the fun of making your own tassels using my instructions in the Color Tassel Jewelry Tutorial.

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Here are the ingredients I used for this version:

  • A piece of 38″ (96.5cm) robin-egg blue satin cord from a craft store.
  • My handmade tassels made from embroidery thread, craft wire, and jump rings.

Components for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Here’s a step-by-step of tying the tassels to the ends of the cord:

How to tie tassels to necklace ends for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

When the tassels are attached, the cord ends look like this:

Finished ends of Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The finished necklace looks like this:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

And here it’s worn wrapped around the neck:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Wrap Choker Necklace #2:
Leather Cord and Beads with Bead Caps

Of the four styles I made here, this version is closest to the original 1970’s leather or suede version of this necklace style.

I’ve used a super-long leather cord here, which you could use for multiple wraps around the neck, or for artistically long cord ends hanging down:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Here are the ingredients I used for this version:

  • 60″ (152.4cm) natural leather cord in 2mm size.
  • Teardrop beads and round beads with antiqued bead caps, strung on headpins and finished off with jump rings.

Components for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Tie the the beaded dangles to the cord ends, the same way as shown above in “Version 1 – Satin Cord and Tassels”.

The finished cord ends should look like this:

Beaded cord ends for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The finished necklace should look something like this:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

And you can wrap and drape the long cord however it suits you:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Wrap Choker Necklace #3:
Art Fiber Strand and Large-Hole Beads

This colorful strand of art fiber adds an extra level of artsy-ness to the necklace.

If you’ll be using art fibers for jewelry, make sure they are soft and not scratchy.

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

You can find art fiber strands in various places online (etsy.com is a good source), by searching for “art fiber” or “art fiber bundle”.

You may also find them in your local craft or fabric stores.

The ingredients in this necklace:

  • 36″ (91.4cm) multi-color art fiber yarn strand.
  • 2 large-hole beads that will accommodate the art fiber strand.

Components for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

String a large-hole bead onto each end of the art fiber strand.

Leave a few inches of the strand below each bead to tie a knot in the strand to hold the bead in place.

After tying the knots, fluff out the ends of the cord for a fringey effect:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The necklace ends should look something like this:

Finished cord ends for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

And the finished necklace looks like this; you could even wear it with the ends hanging down like a scarf as shown below:

Finished Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Or you could do two wraps around the throat and tie the cord ends:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Wrap Choker Necklace #4:
1920’s Chain and Pendants

This is the shortest of the four necklaces I created here.

I like the 1920’s flapper-era feel that these components give it.

The chain needs to be smooth and flexible enough to wrap comfortably around the neck.

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The ingredients of this style:

  • 18″ (45.7cm) vintage twist chain.
  • 2 medium-size lightweight pendants (mine are 15mm x 35mm [0.59″ x 1.37″]).
  • 2 jump rings (my jump rings came attached to the vintage twist chain).

Components for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Use a jump ring to attach a pendant to each end of your chain:

Pendants attached to chain ends for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The finished necklace should look something like this:

Finished necklace for Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

This chain length is too short to wrap around the neck more than once, so I did one wrap and then tied the ends in an easy overhand knot, and left the ends to dangle below the collarbone:

Wrap Choker Necklace - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

I’d love to see the wrap choker necklaces you make from your own stash! Please share them here! 🙂

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Comments

  1. Catherine Franz says:

    Just sharing…several policemen and policewomen (at a trade show I was selling at their location) told me not to make something like this. It makes it too easy for robbers or people who want to hurts grab us by the throat and twist a little to harm us. Thus, I stopped making this type.

  2. I love this style of necklace, it’s graceful and simple and i love all these alternate ways to work this style. Thanks Rena! And thanks Catherine for the warning. But really, that could be said of any necklace style, anyone could grab any necklace and pull or twist it on the persons neck.

  3. I agree with Megan, any necklace you wear could be used as a weapon against you….. that said, I will still continue to make and wear necklaces in many styles and lengths…

  4. Purple People Eater says:

    Great design inspiration as always Rena! I always look forward to seeing your creative take on jewelry. Keep it coming.

  5. Eileen Curtis says:

    All are nice but my favorite is the chain version. I like things that have the feel of 1920’s, plus it’s a different way to wear a chain necklace. When I see a style made in different materials as you showed here, it really helps me see how to interpret it in different ways.

  6. I trying to make a beaded necklace and I want to put beaded tassels on the ends and can’t seem to find what I am looking for in beadd tassels. My necklace is made with superduos! Can you help?

  7. Thank you Rena for another great tutorial. I will enjoy making these. I love alternative necklace designs instead of defaulting to beaded necklaces everytime I want to make a new necklace. Like Megan and JJ said, if people are worried about wrap necklaces being dangerous, then all necklace styles should be equally approached with caution. Scarves and neckties would also be equally dangerous. However, I will continue to wear and sell necklaces in all the styles I love to make, including my take on these wrap choker necklaces.

  8. Beautiful, Rena! I love the leather style. Thank you for these tutorials!

  9. Thanks for your lovely comment, Kyle! And you’re very welcome. 🙂

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