Spiral Wire Bead Cap (Tutorial)

by Rena Klingenberg.
Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Dress up your beads with these handmade wire bead caps (modeled here by a 10mm bead).

Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Spiral Wire Bead Cap – tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Once you get into the groove of this project, you can make several of these little goodies very quickly.

Supplies:

  • 1 piece of round soft 20-gauge or 22-gauge wire, 6 cm (2.36″) long.
    You can use copper, brass, sterling silver, etc. – or Artistic wire / craft wire.
  • A round bead – 8mm, 10mm, or 12mm. I used a 10mm bead.
  • Wire cutter.
  • Cup bur or jewelry file for smoothing and rounding your wire ends.
  • Round nose pliers.
  • Chain nose or flat nose pliers.

How to Make
Spiral Wire Bead Caps:

Cut your wire to 6 cm (2.36″) long:

Wire for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Use a cup bur, jewelry file, or knife sharpening stone to smooth and round both ends of your wire:
Smoothing ends of wire for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now we’ll start making a flat wire spiral.

Use the tips of your round nose pliers to grasp the tip of one end of your wire:

Starting the flat spiral for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Start wrapping the wire around the tip of one of your plier jaws:

Making the center of the spiral for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Keep wrapping the wire around the plier jaw until you’ve made a full circle, or one and a half circles:

Continuing the spiral for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now use your chain nose or flat nose pliers to grasp the beginning of your wire spiral:

Keep wrapping the wire around - Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

. . . and continue wrapping your wire around, creating a bigger and bigger flat spiral:
Growing the flat spiral for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Keep wrapping till you’ve used the entire piece of wire:

Use all of your wire for the spiral - Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Your wire should look like this (a cinnamon roll!):

Flat wire spiral for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now we’ll make the spiral cone-shaped, so it will fit like a hat on the end of your bead.

Spear the center of your spiral onto the tip of one of your round nose plier jaws:

Turning spiral into a cone for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Use your fingers to gently push down on the layers of your spiral.

Press down evenly on all sides of your spiral, so the bead cap will have a nicely uniform shape:

Spiral turned into a cone for Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Your wire bead cap is finished!

Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

You may want to make enough of these to cover both ends of each bead in your jewelry project.
Spiral Wire Bead Cap - tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Want to Learn the Basics of
Designing Your Own Wire Jewelry?

Design and Make Artistic Jewelry Components Class In my Design and Make Artistic Jewelry Components video class, you’ll learn how to get great ideas for wire jewelry designs – and then follow my easy system for turning those ideas into successful pieces of jewelry.

By the end of this online video class, you’ll be designing and making your own artistic earwires, clasps, connectors, and pendant bails.

You’ll also learn my tips for making wire jewelry more easily, with more professional looking results.

 

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Comments

  1. Bead caps are a great way to dress up a bead. They really make them special and add so much interest to a design. They sort of make me think of a lady wearing a hat for a special occasion (old fashion image, I know – or maybe not if you’re British royalty 🙂 Your tutorial makes it so easy, I love it!

  2. Thank you for this! It looks good & original & it’s a good way to save $ on beadcaps!

  3. Making bead caps eliminates the agony of not having enough bead caps to finish a project and hoping the local bead store has the same bead cap in stock. I’ll be sure to make some of these bead caps and have them ready for a future project.

  4. Alla P. says:

    This is priceless! Between finding right bead caps and having enough of them on hand, it’s always a problem. This tutorial totally solves the problem. Rena you are brilliant!! Thank you!!!

  5. very cool the talent possessed here is simply amazing

  6. these would make great earrings.

  7. Great tutorial. Thank you for sharing.

  8. I never thought about putting a cap on a bead. Thanks for sharing the idea and tutorial!

  9. The cap is such an elegant addition (but something makes me want to draw a smiley face on the bead 🙂 Thanks for sharing.

  10. Rena, I love the way you mix metals and use wire to create a unique look that displays your artistic talent. I wanna be like you when I grow up (psst….I’m 65).

    Giving a customer jewelry with handmade bead caps is so cool. When my sister in San Francisco receives a compliment on one of my bracelets, she proudly says, “Thanks, I have a personal jewelry designer.”

    I appreciate you, Rena!

  11. that is so increadible,compared to you am an infant in jewellery making,but you are my role model.

  12. Beaded Birch says:

    Twisted wire would make an interesting alternative.

  13. Why didn’t I think of this????? Oh well, glad you did and thanks for sharing. I like using bead caps & they can really dress up a bead….

  14. Love the idea and the instructions. Thank you Rena.

  15. You’re very welcome, Jean BH! That’s lovely to hear. 🙂

  16. Great idea, I am wondering if this was made with sterling silver wire you could hammer for effect before pressing out the cup?

  17. Pat, that would certainly make an interesting effect on the bead cap. You might want to try the hammering effect on a less expensive type of wire first, instead of experimenting on your sterling wire. Then if it works, you can feel comfortable doing it on the silver.

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