Leather Flower Bracelet (Tutorial)

by Rena Klingenberg.

Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

This charming, comfortable bracelet is an easy leatherworking project.

Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

It’s also a good way to recycle leather scraps into a new piece of jewelry!

Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Supplies:

  • Leather scraps in three different colors.
    I bought a 1-pound variety pack of leather scraps at my local craft store for $3.60 (regular price was $5.99, but I used the store’s 40% discount coupon).
    You might also use leather from old belts, purses, jackets, upholstery, etc. Check thrift shops and garage sales for old leather items.
  • 2 identical buttons that contrast nicely against your leather colors – for a decorative way to attach the flowers to the bracelet.
    I recommend using buttons with two holes.
    My buttons are 3/4″ (19mm) in diameter.
  • Waxed cord or waxed thread – for attaching the flowers and buttons to the bracelet band. You’ll need about 12″ (30.5cm) of thin, sturdy cord that will fit through the holes in your buttons.
    I used waxed polyester cord, 1mm size. You could also use waxed linen, waxed cotton, or even unused waxed dental floss.
    (You could use un-waxed cord, but the wax makes the cord stiffer, sturdier and less likely to fray – better for threading it through several layers of leather and buttons – and better for holding leather elements together during years of wearing the finished bracelet.)
  • 2 sturdy jump rings in a fairly large size – one for each end of the leather band.
    My jump rings are 12mm size.
  • Clasp – I used a swivel clasp, from an older bracelet I took apart.
  • 2 metal eyelets (optional) – to reinforce the holes at each end of the leather band. In most fabric stores and craft stores, you can get a package of several eyelets plus a little tool for attaching them to your project, such as this:

    Eyelets and Tool for Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

  • Regular household scissors – for cutting your leather and your waxed cord.
  • Sewing needle (don’t worry, we’re not doing any sewing here! 🙂 ) – to run the waxed cord through the layers of leather and buttons.
    Your entire needle should fit easily through the holes in your buttons. The eye of your needle should be able to accommodate your waxed thread / cord.
  • Leather punch – for making holes in your leather wrist band.
    I used the Crop-A-Dile Big Bite punch, which can also attach your eyelets to the leather band.
    Or you can punch the holes with an inexpensive rotary leather punch tool.
    (Both of these tools are available online and in most craft stores.)
    I’ll also show you a nifty way to pierce small holes in your leather with an ice pick.
  • Chalk or pencil – for drawing the bracelet band and flowers on the back of your leather.
    (Chalk for marking on dark-colored leather, pencil for marking on light-colored leather.)
  • Sharpie marker – for marking the location of punch holes at the ends of the leather wrist band.
  • Flat nose / chain nose pliers – for opening and closing your jump rings.

How to Make a
Leather Flower Bracelet:

First, choose three leather colors:

  • one for the bracelet band (I chose navy blue)
  • one for the larger bottom flower (I chose a dusty pink color)
  • and one for the smaller top flower (I chose an antique white color).

Also choose two identical buttons – one for the center of your flowers, and one for the back of the bracelet, under the flower. (I chose cranberry for the buttons, to provide a pop of color in the center of the flower):

Leather and Button Selection for Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now let’s cut out the leather band of your bracelet.

The length of your leather band should be the measurement of your wrist.

Example: If your wrist measurement is 8″, then make your leather band 8″ long.

(When you add the jump rings and clasp, they will add a bit of extra length that will make the bracelet fit comfortably around your wrist.)

My bracelet is 1-1/8″ (28.6mm) wide, which is a nice width for this bracelet style. However, you may want yours to be wider or narrower than that.

Once you decide on how wide and how long your leather band will be, use a ruler to measure and mark it out on the back of your leather.

Use chalk to mark dark leather, or a pencil to mark light leather:

Mark Bracelet Band on Back of Leather - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Use regular scissors to cut out your leather band:

Cut out the leather bracelet band - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Next we’ll draw and cut out the flowers.

I wanted my flowers to be wider than the 1-1/8″ (28.6mm) wide wrist band.

So my smaller flower is 1.5″ (38mm) in diameter.

My larger flower is 2.25″ (57mm) in diameter.

Now sketch the smaller flower on the back of the leather you chose for it, making sure the flower is nicely larger than the button; then use scissors to cut out the flower:

Sketch flower on back side of leather, and cut it out - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now sketch the larger flower on the back of the leather you chose for it; then cut it out with scissors:

Sketch flower on back side of leather, and cut it out - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

It’s time to make two holes in the center of the wrist band, and in the center of each flower.

These holes will line up perfectly with the two holes in our buttons, so we can attach all of the pieces together with the waxed cord.

Since these will be relatively small holes, an easy way to make them is with an ice pick and an eraser.

The instructions for each step are below this photo:

Piercing holes in leather for Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

  • Photo 1:
    You’ll need a sharp ice pick (or similar tool), and a flat rubber eraser.
  • Photo 2:
    Place the center of your leather wrist band on the center of the eraser, with a button on the exact center of the band.
    Holding the button in place, use the ice pick to “drill” down through each button hole, twisting the pick until it pierces through the leather and pokes into the eraser.
  • Photo 3:
    Now use the same ice pick and eraser technique to pierce two button holes in the center of the smaller flower.
  • Photo 4:
    For piercing the larger flower, place the smaller flower over the larger one, centering them how you want them to fit together.
    Then use the ice pick to drill through the smaller flower’s holes and pierce corresponding holes in the larger flower.

Now that all three leather pieces are pierced with holes that match up with our buttons, they should look something like this:

PIerced leather band and flowers for Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

It’s time to attach all three leather pieces and both buttons together.

Thread your 12″ length of waxed cord onto your needle:

Thread waxed cord onto the needle - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now stack up the bracelet parts in this order:

  • top button
  • smaller flower
  • larger flower
  • wrist band
  • bottom button

. . . with all the pairs of button holes lined up.

Now run your needle through the left-hand holes all the way through the stack, until the needle pokes out of the bottom button:

Attaching components together with waxed cord - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Leave a few inches of cord hanging out from the top button; you’ll need it later to tie a knot.

Now turn the bracelet over so that the underside of it is facing you.

Run your needle through the other button hole – this time, starting on the underside of the bracelet until the needle pokes through the top button:

Attaching components together with waxed cord - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Pull the cord through until it’s tightly across the bottom two holes.

You should still have the first few inches of the cord hanging out of the top button.

Run your needle and cord down through the first set of button holes again.

Then back up from the bottom through the second set of button holes again.

Keep the cord pulled tightly, so that the buttons, flowers, and leather band are all securely and tightly attached together.

Thread the cord through your button holes as many times as you can, until you can’t fit the needle through the button holes anymore. (I was able to make three complete rounds with my needle through the button holes.)

Now it’s time to finish off the waxed cord ends.

The instructions for each step are below this photo:

Finishing off waxed cord ends - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

  • Photo 1:
    Both ends of the cord should end up on the top side of the bracelet.
  • Photo 2:
    Tie the two cord ends into an overhand knot (an overhand knot is the first part of the knot you use when you tie your shoes) . . .
  • Photo 3:
    . . . and tighten the knot down against the button.
  • Photo 4:
    Tie a second overhand knot over the first one, and pull the cord ends so that this knot is very tightly tied.

Now trim off the excess cords, leaving the ends about 0.4″ (10mm) long, to look like the stamen parts in the center of a flower:

Trim waxed cord ends - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The underside of your bracelet should look nice and tidy:

Underside of the attached flower - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The front of your bracelet should now look like this:

Leather flower attached to wrist band - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now it’s time to punch holes at the ends of the wrist band.

IMPORTANT:

Practice marking and punching holes in a piece of scrap leather first, till you’re confident you can punch your holes exactly where you want them in the leather.

Use your Sharpie marker to mark a spot near each end of the wristband:

Mark where to punch your leather - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

We’ll punch holes that are the same size or slightly smaller than your metal eyelets (if you’ve chosen to use eyelets on your bracelet).

Use your leather punch tool (I’m using the Crop-A-Dile Big Bite punch) to punch out the holes you just marked in each end of your wrist band:

Punching holes at ends of wrist band - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now your bracelet should look like this:

Holes punched at ends of bracelet - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Now it’s time to attach the eyelets to your wrist band’s end holes, if you’ve decided to use them.

EXTREMELY IMPORTANT:

Attaching eyelets to leather has a slight learning curve to get the results you want.

So practice with your eyelet-setting tool on a scrap piece of leather first.

Keep practicing until you’re able to set and crimp the eyelets into the holes with good results.

Then you’re ready to attach the eyelets to your actual bracelet.

If you’re using eyelets to reinforce the two holes you just punched at the ends of your leather band, insert an eyelet in the first hole, with the flattened eyelet end on the front side of your wrist band:

Attaching eyelet to leather - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Use your eyelet-setting tool (I’m using the eyelet setting feature on the Crop-a-Dile punch) to crimp your eyelet into place:

Crimping Eyelets on Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The bottom side of the eyelet should now be crimped into place on the underside of your wrist band, and should look something like this:

Underside of finished eyelet for Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Repeat at the other end of the wrist band, to attach an eyelet to the other hole.

After attaching the eyelets to the holes at both ends of your wrist band, it’s time to attach the clasp to your bracelet.

Use your flat nose / chain nose pliers to twist open your jump rings:

Twist open two jump rings - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Thread one jump ring into the hole at one end of your bracelet, and twist the jump ring shut again:

Attaching a jump ring through eyelet hole - Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Attach the remaining jump ring into the hole at the other end of your bracelet.

Thread the clasp onto this jump ring, then twist the jump ring shut again:

Attaching clasp to Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

This is how my fastened clasp looks:

Fastened Clasp on Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The front of your finished Leather Flower Bracelet should look something like this:

Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

And the back should look like this (one of my favorite things about this bracelet is how neat and tidy the underside is on the finished piece):

Underside of finished Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

How it looks when it’s being worn:

Leather Flower Bracelet - Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

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Comments

  1. I love these layered leather flowers, Rena! I never thought of making leather flowers this way, but it’s definitely a technique I’ll have to add for my leather jewellery. It’s nice to be able to use more than one colour 🙂

  2. Thank you, Tamara! I’d love to see how you adapt it for your leather jewelry! 🙂

  3. Lovely, Rena! So pretty!
    jean

  4. Thank you, Jean! 🙂

  5. OMAR MEYER says:

    DEFINITIVAMENTE EXCELENTE Y FANTÁSTICO!

  6. jeanna kendrick says:

    Rena, I am making an antique braclet with Tibetan beads and wanted to use leather as spacers. I saw this medium used on old african beads designs. My question is, what tool do i use to make the leather spacers small? From this article on your leather braclet, i noted an ice pick and an eraser to make the holes for beading. Can I use your crop-a-dile big bite punch to make this? I have a nice size piece of unused leather i wanted to try out. thanks you for your time,

    Jeanna from Las Vegas, NV

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