Wired Copper Jewelry

by Lynda Carson.
(Spring Valley, CA)

Copper bracelets and earrings with amazonite, crystals, and turquoise

Handmade copper bracelet with vintage-looking glass beads

Copper bracelets and earrings with amazonite, crystals, and turquoise Handmade copper bracelet with vintage-looking glass beads Wire and chain copper necklace with tiny beads and handmade clasp

Wire and chain copper necklace with tiny beads and handmade clasp

These are the newest copper jewelry pieces using copper tubing, washers, and wire from the hardware store. Forged, wired wrapped, oxidized in liver of sulphur, and buffed with 0000 steel wool.

I think I’m addicted.

Lynda Carson
Fresh Baked Designs

 

Comments:

Copper Protection
by: Debbie

Love your work, its beautiful. I’ve made some pieces out of copper tubing also. Question – what do you do to the tubing to keep it from tarnishing and what do you do to address skin allergies with copper?

Hi, Debbie–
by: Anonymous

I’m still learning some quirks about working with copper–especially regarding the label “copper’ on packages of wire. I found that most copper craft wire in bead supply stores is coated with a tarnish resistant material and will not oxidize. Be careful. This was a problem because I like to oxidize my copper pieces and then buff the surfaces. (When I bought the tubing and the washers, they were all the bright orangey new copper.) I just like the ‘aged’ look. Well, the craft wire doesn’t oxidize in a liver of sulphur solution–so surprise!! The tubing will oxidize, but the wire won’t and it’s not a good look. The copper wire I’ve purchased in the hardware stores is untreated copper and works well with oxidizing. So, short answer–I don’t worry about oxidizing because that’s my preferred look.

Regarding the ‘greening’ effect that some folks get when wearing copper. I haven’t done anything and haven’t received any complaints, but have read that brushing on a coat of clear nail polish–especially on ear wires- not only keeps the finish of the copper, but helps prevent the skin reaction.

Have fun with it–it’s a great medium to work with and so inexpensive. My sweet husband handed me a fistful of copper wiring the other day from his stash in the garage. Of course I’ll have to strip off the insulation first, but small price to pay for a great gift. If I’m learning a new technique–I always work it out in copper before moving on to sterling silver, especially good considering the price of silver today.

Another thought about copper
by: Lynda Carson

I forgot to mention another strategy for slowing down the tarnishing effect on both sterling and copper is to keep the jewelry in zip lock baggies or containers with lids (anything to limit contact with the air).

Cleaning Copper Jewely
by: Sherry Kelaidis

If you want to bring your “tarnished” copper back to it’s original shiny state…simply give it a bath in lemon and water. It is almost instantaneous! Just be sure to rinse and dry well…and then to keep it that way, wipe it after wearing and store it in a zip lock bag. Do NOT do this to a piece which has been “antiqued”, as it may remove the effect.

Wired Copper
by: Bella

Very ingenious and great design,saves money to

Tarnish on Copper
by: Bella

I just read your comments on copper tarnish, it is best not to put nail varnish on it as some customers can react to this.
Some Nail varnish has got quite aggressive chemicals in them.

If you know of or can speak to a Electrician or better plumber they may give you there pure scrap copper, then you can age it as well,putting Bi Carbonate of soda in it helps to stop tarnishing I have heard.
Hope this helps.

FREE - Get 7 Super Jewelry Making Hacks

Get Rena's 7 Super Jewelry Making Hacks, plus the Jewelry Making Journal Newsletter - all for FREE.

We Respect Your Email Privacy

>