Lacy Jewelry (Tutorial)

by Rena Klingenberg.

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

We’re going to make lacy jewelry by Mod Podging pieces of paper lace doilies to jewelry components.

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

You can create jewelry that’s anywhere from romantic to dramatic with simple lace cut-outs.
Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

And since you can use Mod Podge to attach things to nearly any surface, you can try this technique on lots of different jewelry components.

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Supplies:

  • Paper lace doilies – mine are 4″ (10cm) diameter, and I found them in the cake-decorating area of the craft section in a local store.
    I chose the smallest doily size available because the lace pattern was smaller and more suitable for jewelry.

    Paper Lace Doily (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

  • Jewelry components to decorate with the lace – I used wooden 2-hole beads called “placemat tile beads”; an aluminum washer from the hardware store; and a brass jewelry pendant frame.
  • Scissors.
  • Pencil.
  • Small amount of Mod Podge – the glue / sealer for decoupage projects (be sure to read and follow the advice on the Mod Podge jar):

    Mod Podge (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

  • Waxed paper – as a protective surface under your Mod Podge procedure.
  • Jewelry chains, cords, and findings – to turn your finished lacy components into wearable jewelry!

How to Make Lacy Jewelry:

First we’ll learn how to Mod Podge your paper lace cut-outs onto the jewelry components.

Then we’ll have more tips and techniques for creating this type of lacy jewelry.

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

How to Mod Podge Your
Lace Cut-Out to the Jewelry Component:

Once you have your lace cut-outs, you’re ready to Mod Podge them to your beads.

Spread out a small sheet of waxed paper for a work surface.

The steps are written below this photo:

Mod Podge Instructions (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

  1. Place your clean, dry jewelry component on the waxed paper.
  2. Use your fingertip to scoop up a dollop of Mod Podge, and spread it in an even layer over the entire surface of your component.
  3. Place your lace cut-out where you want it to be on your jewelry component, pressing it down onto your wet Mod Podge layer and smoothing out any bubbles or wrinkles in your paper lace.
  4. Scoop up another fingertip-full of Mod Podge and spread it evenly and smoothly over the entire top surface of your component, covering your lace as well as the bead.

After the Mod Podge dries thoroughly, apply two more coats of Mod Podge, drying completely after each coat.

To dry your Mod Podged creations faster, use a hair dryer on “Low” setting:

Drying the Mod Podge (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

Move the hair dryer constantly around your creations so they dry without overheating or blowing away!

Lacy Jewelry Example 1 –
Rectangle Wooden Beads:

Here are two “before and after” examples using 2-hole rectangle wooden beads that were cut from a placemat:

2 Hole Bead Before and After (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)
2 Hole Bead Before and After (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

When cutting out your lace shapes, you might want to experiment with the curved decorative edge that goes around the center solid circle of the doily.

That curved line can make lovely designs:

Lace Cut-Out (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

Also experiment with cutting abstract shapes from the lace (this piece was a scrap leftover from other cuts):

Lace Cut-Out (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

If you want to cut a piece of doily lace to fit your jewelry component, place the component on the doily and trace around it with a pencil; then cut with scissors just inside that pencil line:

Measuring for Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

The finished lacy beads make nice focals for necklaces or bracelets:

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg
Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

To turn this 2-hole bead into a dramatic necklace, I simply strung a black cord through the holes and knotted the cord ends below the bead:

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Lacy Jewelry Example 2 –
Metal Washer Donut:

Here’s an aluminum washer from the hardware store, before and after:
Metal Washer (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

I cut a piece of doily lace to go partway around this donut:

Paper Lace Cut-Out for Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

If you don’t want white lace, you can color it with markers, paint, alcohol inks, colored pencils, etc. before Mod Podging it onto your jewelry component.

I used a marker to put two coats of black ink on this piece of paper lace:

Coloring the Paper Lace (Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg)

After Mod Podging the entire surface of the donut, the metal has a nice “jewelry” look and feel.

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

You could add beads and wire-wrapping on the bare metal top of this pendant.

I kept it simple with a black satin cord attached to the donut with a larks-head knot:

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Lacy Jewelry Example 3 –
Pendant Frame:

Here’s a brass pendant frame, before and after:

Brass Pendant Frame Before and After - Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

This pendant has two layers of paper Mod Podged to the brass frame – a small square of purple paper:

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

. . . and a paper lace cut-out:

Paper Lace Cut-Out for Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

If you’ll be using more than one layer of paper (or whatever embellishment), dry the top coat of Mod Podge thoroughly before adding another layer of Mod Podge for the next layer of paper.

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

To turn this lacy pendant into a necklace, I added a jump ring to the pendant’s loop, and strung a rustic chain through it:

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

In this tutorial I’ve shown a few simple examples to get you started.

But there are a lot of other creative things you can add to this basic idea, involving things like:

  • textures
  • glitter
  • collaging
  • beads
  • rubber stamping the paper doilies
  • wirework
  • shabby-chic distressed finish
  • metal stamping
  • metal patina . . . etc.

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

Lacy Jewelry Tutorial by Rena Klingenberg

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  • Tamara says:

    Very cool and interesting take on lace jewellery, Rena! 🙂

  • Lee says:

    I do like this idea. And I see how your principals of design (that I learned from your class) can apply here. And I thank you for telling me where to buy paper doilies. I’ve looked high and low for them but never thought of looking in the cake decorating supplies. I’ve been experimenting with real lace and resin. You simply paint the resin onto the lace then apply the lace to your jewelry piece. Of course, not ALL types of lace work, you have to play around and experiment. You can also use the lace alone and hang beads from it to make cool earrings. I probably should have posted up a photo of the black lace and pearls I made. You can also add just a hint of glitter to the resin and give your lace a bit of bling.

  • Maxine says:

    Great idea! You know how you fold up a piece of paper and keep cutting until you have a little snowflake? I think that would be great in this project, and I’m going to try that. Thanks for the inspiration, Rena.

  • Lisa Fisher says:

    I love the lace idea. You could make your own paper lace. Could you make snowflakes by folding you paper and cutting a design in it. Then you could really put your own work out there. Love the lace idea. Thank you so much for showing this and sharing. I think I’ll try some today.
    Lisa

  • Val says:

    What a creative idea! Inexpensive too which is a bonus!

  • I enjoy tatting, and frequently experiment with creating my own designs. They don’t always work the first time, so I have small motifs and pieces that I have kept, but they aren’t really good for anything, and I should have tossed them to help eliminate extra clutter. I have not because I liked their look and couldn’t bear to just throw them away. After seeing this project, I am going to see if I can use the same process but with these pieces. There is great potential there. Thank you.

  • Cari says:

    Now that’s what I call artistic… using something so simple to create something so unique. Excellent Rena… Fabulous and Fun! Thanks for sharing!

  • Julia Zimmerman says:

    Love the lacy tutorial but I’m curious, what did you mean by two hole bead cut from a placemat? Don’t know of this kind or placemat.

  • Thanks for asking, Julia! They are more accurately called “placemat tile beads” or “bamboo tile beads” – and are often used in making placemats. You can buy the individual beads from various Etsy sellers and elsewhere online, but mine were actually acquired by cutting apart a placemat that was made from these beads! 🙂

  • Oh Rena, I just love you to bits! This is phenomenal!!!!!

  • Love this idea of using paper doilies to create lacy jewellery, beautiful but simple and inexpensive, especially if you use the washer for your base.

  • Mel says:

    It’s a very pretty idea and could be used in hundreds of different ways. I really love the washer one.

  • Marty says:

    These are stunning and what a great tutorial. Very different and so creative. Hugs, Marty

  • JaneEllen says:

    Great post, loved it. I’d love to find those rectangular wood beads, love the shape. My imagination is going crazy thinking of all the things to put on that bead, so fun. Love your tutorials. You make it look so easy and does seem to be. I’ve got some of the brass square pendants so will work with them also. You’ve really inspired me. Happy week

  • Great idea, I think my teen would like to try this!

  • Jill says:

    Love it! The possibilities are endless!

  • Julie says:

    Wow, these is so simple and so effective. Love them. What a great homemade present idea.

  • Lori says:

    Your pendants are so pretty, so original, so inexpensive, and look so easy to make. Thanks for the great tutorial.

  • Amie says:

    These are gorgeous! What a clever way to use a little lacy cutout.. Love them~
    xoxo
    Amie @ Pinkapotamus

  • Linda says:

    Beautiful and creative jewelry! Thanks for the great tutorial! Glad you shared this!

  • Linda says:

    Pinning. Thanks, Rena, for the tute. Linda

  • Allison says:

    Isn’t it amazing the things you can do with Mod Podge? These are so pretty! Thanks for sharing 🙂

  • Camila says:

    I love all the styles! This is super creative using lace! it looks so lovely! Pining!

    XOXO
    Cami @ TitiCrafty

  • Theresa says:

    I never thought of using doilies in jewlery. Clever idea. Love how they turned out. Thanks for sharing

  • So pretty!

  • Linda says:

    Very unusual interesting. Best wishes, Linda

  • isabel cristina says:

    esta muy buena la idea, esta fuera de lo normal. muchas gracias por sus aportes

  • Helen says:

    Great tutorial, but my one worry is this… is Mod Podge really durable or archival enough to use for jewelry..?

  • Hi Helen, thanks for asking! I have used Mod Podge in many types of mixed-media jewelry projects, and I have found it to be very durable and sturdy. If you have a particular project in mind, you might start out by doing a test run using scraps of the materials you’ll be using – to see whether Mod Podge will create the quality and results you’re intending for the finished piece.

    Whenever I’m using a new-to-me jewelry technique or material, I do test runs first to see what kind of results I can expect. (Also to familiarize myself with the technique / materials before using them on my “real” piece.) 🙂

  • Helen says:

    How wonderful! I will give it a go! 🙂 Thanx for all that you share with us here, Rena – you’re a star!

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