Cluttered vs. Tidy Work Area – Where are You More Creative? (Video)

Jewelry and Coffee with Rena

by Rena Klingenberg.

Here’s what a recent study reveals about creativity and clutter vs. tidiness. Where are you more creative?

Transcript of this Video:

Are you more creative when you work in a cluttered space, or in a space that’s neat and tidy?

I recently read about an interesting study by researchers at the University of Minnesota.

The researchers found that a cluttered workspace tends to encourage innovative thinking and trying new things.

And that a neat, orderly workspace tends to encourage traditional thinking and playing it safe.

Of course, these results are what the researchers observed – but that doesn’t mean they necessarily apply to everyone.

But I’m interested in how they apply to jewelry artists.

For me, when it comes to working with wire and metals, I tend to be most creative when I have a space that’s cleared off and tidy.

That makes me feel open and like there’s nothing in my way to allow creativity in – and I don’t want things around the edges distracting me.

But if I’m working with beads, it does help me to have a variety of beads all around, to see how different colors and shapes work together – it’s a great way to discover surprising new color combinations!

But if I get too many different beads all over my bead board, I start to feel less creative and I usually wind up putting the project aside till later.

What about you?

Where are you more creative – do you need an area that’s neat and tidy, or a more cluttered environment?

Please share your experiences in the comments below – I’d love to hear what you have to say about this!

Thanks for stopping in today, and I’ll see you next time.

The Jewelry Rena’s Wearing
in This Video:

Coffee and Cream jewelry set by Rena Klingenberg

Necklace and Earrings – “Coffee and Cream” jewelry set by Rena Klingenberg. Ceramic pendant with Czech glass, sterling silver, copper.

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